Property maintenance software is a tool that some managers swear by. They realize that without it, they would have difficulty keeping up with both emergency and regular maintenance tasks necessary to take great care of a property.

That said, some consider it a waste of money. They find that paying for the software is a luxury they can do just fine without.

Which boat do you think you’re in? To help you decide, here are a few points to consider before making the investment.

Property Maintenance Software’s Usefulness Depends on You

Are you a great planner? Do you have everything well thought-out and organized ahead of time, and you mark your calendar for when you have to do certain things?

Note this doesn’t just apply to your work life, but your personal life as well. If you plan out your child’s birthday party months in advance, you’re obviously a great planner.

Well-organized people usually get more out of their maintenance software than those who fly by the seat of their pants. They’re already used to breaking down maintenance tasks, so they just have to program their existing schedule into the software. This shouldn’t take too much time, as these programs are usually fairly straight-forward.

Now, what if you aren’t a planner? In general, you won’t get much use out of this software. You’re more likely to keep doing property maintenance as you always have- putting out fires rather than scheduling everything ahead of time.

Startups Don’t Need Property Maintenance Software

Small property management companies can probably spend better places to invest time and money than every kind of software they think they may need. Cash is usually very limited, so there may be large opportunity costs if they spend too much time focusing on tools (like software) rather than the core of the business.

For example, it doesn’t make sense to invest in this software if you don’t have many properties to manage yet!

You May Already Have Property Maintenance Software and Just Not Realize It

Many property management software products have multiple modules, or capabilities. While you may only use it for certain things, such as tracking expenses and rent payments, it may also be able to schedule maintenance tasks for you.

To find out, there are a few different things to try. The first (and probably fastest) is to just poke around in the software. If you were taught to always use the same tabs or buttons, it may be that another tab or menu will bring you to maintenance scheduling.

Another option is to check out the software company’s website. It may be that you have a “light” version of the software, but a more advanced version can give you what you need.

Finally, ask other people in the industry. It may be that some of them have worked with the software and know a few things you don’t. And since most of us learn best when taught by someone else, this is a good way to learn a few things you probably didn’t already know.

Ask Your Maintenance Team

Assuming you have a maintenance team, how do they feel about the idea of getting property maintenance software? Do they believe it would be helpful, reminding them what tasks are coming up and what materials are required? Or do they just think it’s a waste of time, as it’d be something new they would have to learn?

This is an issue almost every company deals with, one way or another. They’re interested in trying a new software product, but don’t go to the actual users. Or maybe they do ask the actual users, but don’t do a trial run before fully adopting it. This can cause major issues in morale and productivity, just as it may hamper your team’s ability to maintain things on time.

property maintenance software

Before you buy maintenance software, ask a maintenance guy what he thinks!
Image Source: pixabay.com

Bottom Line- Will it Make the Company More Money?

At the end of the day, your job is to help your company make money. If you believe adopting property maintenance software will help, go for it! But if it seems unnecessary, as maybe you already have a great maintenance system or you would rather just deal with issues as the come up, it’s certainly not a requirement to be successful.